St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church

Bulletins 2017
READINGS FOR THE WEEK
Monday: Rom 4:20-25; Lk 1:69-75; Lk 12:13-21
Tuesday: Rom 5:12, 15b, 17-19, 20b-21; Ps 40:7-10, 17; Lk 12:35-38
Wednesday: Rom 6:12-18; Ps 124:1b-8; Lk 12:39-48
Thursday: Rom 6:19-23; Ps 1:1-4, 6; Lk 12:49-53
Friday: Rom 7:18-25a; Ps 119:66, 68, 76-77, 93-94; Lk 12:54-59
Saturday: Eph 2:19-22; Ps 19:2-5; Lk 6:12-16
Sunday: Ex 22:20-26; Ps 18:2-4, 47, 51; 1 Thes 1:5c-10; Mt 22:34-40

Let us pray for the health of: ​
Wanda, Darleen Ball, Tripp Lasseter, Giovanni Beltran & Lisa Montisano  Fr. Marvin LeFrois 

 For the Eternal rest of:
                                  All Souls

TREASURES FROM OUR TRADITION
In 1971, the Vatican Congregation for Divine Worship completed a survey of the presidents of the national liturgical commissions around the world. How were children doing in the liturgical reform? Probably to their surprise, the cardinals learned of special weekday Masses for children designed to teach them how to participate on Sunday, Masses with separate components for children. The decision was made quickly to develop adaptations for Masses where children were a majority of the assembly. Changes would include a simpler structure, understandable texts, a simplified Lectionary, more active participation, and most surprisingly, new Eucharistic Prayers. By 1973 the work was done, and with very specific advice from Pope Paul VI, including the need for two new Eucharistic Prayers, the Directory for Masses with Children was published on December 20, a timely Christmas gift for the children of the world.
The prayers are the first to be written fresh in a modern language--not Latin, but French and German--then translated into English, Italian, and Spanish. With a sense of caution, these new prayers were approved for three years, until 1977, but it soon became apparent that they had truly been embraced.
--Rev. James Field, Copyright (c) J. S. Paluch Co.

TODAY'S READINGS
First Reading -- The LORD said to Cyrus, his anointed, "I am the LORD, there is no other" (Isaiah 45:1, 4-6).
Psalm -- Give the Lord glory and honor (Psalm 96).
Second Reading -- Paul, Silvanus, and Timothy to the church of the Thessalonians: We thank God always for all of you (1 Thessalonians 1:1-5b).
Gospel -- Give to Caesar what is Caesar's, and to God what is God's  (Matthew 22:15-21).
The English translation of the Psalm Responses from Lectionary for Mass (c) 1969, 1981, 1997, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved.

PROOF OF LOVE
The proof of love is in the works. Where love exists, it works great things. But when it ceases to act, it ceases to exist.
--St. Gregory the Great

October 22, 2017
Twenty-ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time
POWER STRUGGLE
Power struggles occur on every level of society, from the world stage to relationships at work, to our own homes. We struggle for position in the hierarchy of power: Who has power over whom? How do they wield it? What is the source of that power? What is the healthy response?
In this Sunday's Gospel reading the Pharisees engage Jesus in a power struggle over whether Jews should show tribute to Caesar by paying taxes. Jesus' response puts this and every struggle for power into perspective. In harmony with the words of Isaiah and Paul, Jesus teaches us that God is the ultimate source of all power--the power of earthly rulers, the Pharisees, Jesus, the Church, and the power within ourselves.
Copyright (c) J. S. Paluch Co., Inc.

SAINTS AND SPECIAL OBSERVANCES
Sunday: Twenty-ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time; World Mission Day
Monday: St. John of Capistrano
Tuesday: St. Anthony Mary Claret
Saturday: Ss. Simon and Jude

Twenty-ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time
It is a scene that could be taken from the daily news feed. A young upstart is confronted by two established leaders. While holding opposing views on many issues, the two band together in an attempt to trap the newcomer. This is not a story from the daily news, however. The newcomer is Jesus in today's Gospel passage. The two established leaders, one a Pharisee and the other a Herodian, think they can trap Jesus by posing a question about the payment of taxes. No matter how he might respond to their question, they would have the means to discredit him. Jesus sees through their hypocrisy and does not fall into their trap. His response gets at the heart of what is truly important: "Then repay to Caesar what belongs to Caesar and to God what belongs to God." 

THERE IS NO GOD BESIDES ME
Most of us can admit that we do not readily think of our lives and possessions as belonging to God. Doing so calls us to think much more deeply about how we use our time, material goods, talents, and gifts in our daily lives. When we take to heart that everything that we are and have belongs to God, we learn to put God first. No longer can materialism or worldly success be our god, nor the unbounded activity that fills much of our lives. Each of us has been "loved and chosen" by God to bring Christ's presence to the world, through the power and inspiration of the Holy Spirit (see 1 Thessalonians 1:4). We do this by giving what belongs to God back to God through the proper use of our lives, gifts, and resources.

Beatriz
Jodi
Sergio
Gael
Yesenia
L.C.
Elena
Elizabeth
Jessica
Giovanni
Javier jr.
Kenton
Nina
Arturo
Erlinda
Kathryn
Laura
Donald
Lisbet
Fernando
Robert
Leonides
Argelia 
Maria
Valerie
Layla
Darlla
Narciso 
John
Mireya 
Henry

Octubre 1
Octubre 2
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Octubre 3
Octubre 6
Octubre 7
Octubre 8
Octubre 9
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Octubre 10
Octubre 10
Octubre 12
Octubre 12
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Octubre 13
Octubre 18
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Octubre 19
Octubre 20
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Octubre 21
Octubre 22
Octubre 22
Octubre 26
Octubre 27
Octubre 27
Octubre 28
Octubre 29
Octubre 29
Octubre 30
Octubre 31



​Potter
Acree
Contreras
Garcia
Mondragon
Martin
Viveros
Milkas
Mixon
Beltran
Beltran
Morrison
Waters
Contreras
Duran
Giddens
Vasquez
Christiano
Luviano
Rodriguez
Goddard
Escalera
Moncada-Marin
Reyes
Komara
Williams
Treviño
Cervantes 
Castillo
Solis 
Richbourg

WHAT BELONGS TO GOD?
God creates all that is. Each of us is a marvelous creation of God. All that we have is created through the grace of God and the ways in which we humans use the gifts that have been given to use by God. Thinking about Jesus' question from this perspective leads us to ask ourselves what belongs to God. As the Lord tells Cyrus in today's first reading, each of us is called by name. We belong to God. If we are truly honest in our reflection, the conclusion we will reach is that everything is God's. We are to be good stewards of it all. Jesus' instruction to give "to God what belongs to God" calls us to take seriously the realization that all we are, have, and will be is a gift from God, given to us in trust, that we might use it to further God's kingdom on earth.

GOOD EXAMPLE
A good example is the tallest kind of preaching.
--African saying

FAITH
All I have seen teaches me to trust the Creator for all I have not seen.
--Ralph Waldo Emerson