St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church

Bulletins 2017
READINGS FOR THE WEEK
Monday: 1 Thes 1:1-5, 8b-10; Ps 149:1b-6a, 9b; Mt 23:13-22
Tuesday: 1 Thes 2:1-8; Ps 139:1-6; Mk 6:17-29
Wednesday: 1 Thes 2:9-13; Ps 139:7-12ab; Mt 23:27-32
Thursday: 1 Thes 3:7-13; Ps 90:3-5a, 12-14, 17; Mt 24:42-51
Friday: 1 Thes 4:1-8; Ps 97:1, 2b, 5-6, 10-12; Mt 25:1-13
Saturday: 1 Thes 4:9-11; Ps 98:1, 7-9; Mt 25:14-30
Sunday: Jer 20:7-9; Ps 63:2-6, 8-9; Rom 12:1-2; Mt 16:21-27

Let us pray for the health of: ​
Elizabeth Chery, George Scaff, Susie Guay, Bubba Knight, Niki Nash, Tripp Lasseter, Darleen Ball, Reina Soto,
 Patrick Costello,  Fr. Marvin LeFrois & Jerry Adkins 
 For the Eternal rest of:
         Fr. Michel Smith, Mr.Raymond Owens &
 Mr. Frank Calhoun 


TREASURES FROM OUR TRADITION
Eucharistic Prayer II is a popular choice for Mass since it is both simple in structure and short. It is written with a preface, which is the section after the dialogue "The Lord be with you . . . Lift up your hearts . . . Let us give thanks," which introduces all the Eucharistic Prayers. The preface states the reason for the eucharistic assembly on that occasion, and there are dozens of them covering almost every imaginable gathering for prayer, some specific to feasts, others for Masses for the dead or for other needs. The preface attached to the second Eucharistic Prayer may be dropped in favor of a more appropriate choice, especially one of the prefaces for weekdays. The General Instruction of the Roman Missal says that Eucharistic Prayer II is best suited for weekdays or "special circumstances." In practice, however, it has become the common Sunday prayer because of its brevity and its comfortable familiarity. It also includes an optional phrase for adding the name of a deceased person remembered in the Mass, and therefore is often prayed at funerals. Article 50 of the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy specified that the rites are to be simplified and restored "to the vigor they had in the tradition of the Fathers." The rebirth of this ancient Roman prayer is a worthy response to this call.​
TODAY'S READINGS
First Reading -- Eliakim is destined by God to be a father to those who live in Jerusalem (Isaiah 22:19-23).
Psalm -- Lord, your love is eternal; do not forsake the work of your hands (Psalm 138).
Second Reading -- How deep are the riches and the wisdom and the knowledge of God! (Romans 11:33-36).
Gospel -- Jesus asked the disciples, "Who do you say that I am?" (Matthew 16:13-20).
The English translation of the Psalm Responses from Lectionary for Mass (c) 1969, 1981, 1997, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved.

Regina M.
Paula
Kayla
Anahi
Maria 
Warren
Carlos
Roger
Maria
Nichelle
Amelia
Adam
Lailani
Ariel
Ricardo
Aiden
Richard
Yajaira
Kent
Josef
Lance
Rosa 
Ana
Alfredo
Charlotte
Litzy 
Thomas
Marian
Patricia
Krystal
Brian
Jose
Samuel

ONLY ONE
God loves each of us as if there were only one of us.
--St. Augustine

HAPPY PEOPLE
The happiest people don't necessarily have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything.
--Anonymous
August 27, 2017
Twenty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time
BE A ROCK
Peter's history as a follower or friend of Jesus is a bit spotty. It might be natural to wonder if Jesus, in giving him the keys to the kingdom, didn't feel a bit like a parent giving a teenager the keys to the family car. But it was at the moment when God's power and presence broke through everything else to raise up Peter's great profession of faith in Christ as Messiah that Jesus chose to establish the bond between the loving, forgiving mercy of heaven and our vocation to be witnesses of that love, mercy, and forgiveness on earth.
Like any parent, Jesus no doubt foresaw the failings, the irresponsible maneuvers or impaired senses, the collisions that the church would be headed for. But, most importantly, he also saw us at that moment as God prefers to see us: capable of manifesting great faith, with a willingness to remain at the feet of Christ to understand what it truly means to be Messiah and Christ. As the letter to the Romans points out to us today, we have not known the mind or the wisdom of God, but God knows us and still chooses to manifest the reign of justice, joy, beauty, and peace through us. Let this be our vocation. Let us always strive to be solid ground on which the church of Jesus Christ can be founded and on which it can continue to be built.
Copyright (c) J. S. Paluch Co., Inc.
SAINTS AND SPECIAL OBSERVANCES
Sunday: Twenty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time
Monday: St. Augustine
Tuesday: The Passion of St. John the Baptist
Friday: World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation; First Friday
Saturday: Blessed Virgin Mary; First Saturday

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IMPRESSIONABLE
When we try to make an impression, that's exactly the impression we make.
--Anonymous
Salazar
Benson
Delgado
Juarez
Juarez
Scoby
Contreras
Johnson
Lopez-Juarez
Milkas
Gomez-Silva
Goss
Zipperer
Leadbetter
Juarez
 Brownell
Varn
Oropeza
Williams
Rivera
Nelms
Vega-Jaimes
Hernandez
Duran
Simpson
Juarez
Nelms
Burns
Costello
Bailon
Woody
Enchautequi
Guajardo

Twenty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time
Over the past several weeks, Matthew's Gospel has shown us a variety of Jesus' miracles: multiplying fish and bread, walking on water, and expelling demons. Thousands of people have witnessed Jesus' miraculous powers. Yet today, when Peter professes his faith in Jesus as the Messiah, Jesus swears him to secrecy. We might wonder at Jesus' gag order after his very public miracles. Saint Paul's Letter to the Romans captures our curiosity: "How inscrutable are his judgments and how unsearchable his ways!" Today's readings ask us to have faith in a marvelous God who guides us in ways we cannot fully understand. The readings from Isaiah and the Gospel both show us times when the Lord designates earthly leaders. Eliakim and Peter are fallible men, yet God entrusts them with far-reaching, even eternal, responsibility. Trusting God's wisdom, we pray for our leaders and join together to worship the Lord.

WHAT'S IN A NAME?
In a dramatic moment, Jesus gives Simon a new name: Peter, the rock. The account of Simon's new name is told differently in other Gospels. In John and Mark, Jesus renames Simon upon first meeting him and calling him to be one of the Twelve. Here in Matthew's account, however, Jesus changes Simon into Peter only after he professes his faith in Jesus as the Messiah. Peter's experience helps us reflect on dramatic moments in our own lives: "What is a personal moment that affected me so radically that I seemed to become a new person? What transformative experience changed my name, either literally or figuratively?"